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OR&R Presents Spill Modeling Capability and Role to NOAA-USGS Hydrology Coordinating Meeting

APRIL 1, 2016--Representatives from OR&R joined the National Weather Service and two other National Ocean Service Offices, the Office of Coast Survey and the National Geodetic Survey, for the 147th Meeting of the NOAA-USGS Committee on Hydrology on March 24, 2016.

This group addresses program coordination between the two agencies on hydrology -- the science of the movement, distribution, and quality of water. Scott Lundgren, OR&R Emergency Response Division chief, and Glen Watabayashi, chief of the Technical and Scientific Services Branch attended the meeting to address a request for better understanding of oil spill modeling capabilities within OR&R. In addition to speaking to the capabilities and experience of OR&R in modeling as part of our scientific support services, OR&R representatives heard about the transformational nature of the new National Water model as well as work on the Open Water Data Infrastructure and the related Spill Use Case working group. The Emergency Response Division will support the request to contribute expertise to this initiative to ensure awareness of OR&R's modeling capability, role, and primary geographic areas of operation. In contributing to this work, the Emergency Response Division will also keep the National Response Team posted on our contributions, as the Emergency Response Division's primary scientific support is to Coast Guard Federal On-Scene Coordinators preparing for and responding to spills in the coastal zone; this support does extend to the riverine environment in in support of the Coast Guard, such as a spate of inland rivers support in early 2016, as well as in support of EPA upon request in cases such as the 2011 Yellowstone River Oil Spill and the Spill of National Significance Exercise series in 2015-2016. For further information, contact Scott.Lundgren@noaa.gov. Go back to OR&R Weekly Report.

Graphic of multiple illustrations.
The creation of a oil spill trajectory forecast. (NOAA)