Articles from October 17, 2014

Posted: October 17, 2014

Under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA), chemical facilities with certain quantities of Extremely Hazardous Substances (EHSs) must annually submit facility information to the local authorities for emergency planning and response purposes.

Posted: October 17, 2014

2014 was a ground breaking year for the NOAA Marine Debris program. We paved the way in the marine debris field by releasing a first of its kind economic study that assessed how litter affects beachgoers‘ economic welfare and publishing marine debris science papers summarizing the issues of entanglement and ingestion.

Posted: October 17, 2014
Art contest poster.

Ready, set, draw! Grab your kids, art supplies, and spread the word--about marine debris of course!

Posted: October 17, 2014
Three men by the water's edge.

On October 7-9, 2014, staff from OR&R’s Emergency Response Division met at the NOAA Kasitsna Bay Laboratory, near Homer, Alaska, to share new science and technology for emergency response.

Posted: October 17, 2014
Students watching a presentation on a large screen.

On October 14, 2014, the NOAA Disaster Response Center (DRC) hosted the annual SkyWarn Program Storm Spotter Training offered by the Mobile-Pensacola Weather Forecasting Office.

Posted: October 17, 2014

OR&R’s Dr. Alan Mearns, Courtney Arthur, and Nicolle Rutherford partnered with experts from California State University, EPA and industry to compose Effects of Pollution on Marine Organisms .

Posted: October 17, 2014
Water celery in a river.

Until recently the lower Hudson River estuary supported about 4450 acres of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV).

Articles from October 17, 2014

Posted: October 17, 2014

Under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA), chemical facilities with certain quantities of Extremely Hazardous Substances (EHSs) must annually submit facility information to the local authorities for emergency planning and response purposes.

Posted: October 17, 2014

2014 was a ground breaking year for the NOAA Marine Debris program. We paved the way in the marine debris field by releasing a first of its kind economic study that assessed how litter affects beachgoers‘ economic welfare and publishing marine debris science papers summarizing the issues of entanglement and ingestion.

Posted: October 17, 2014
Art contest poster.

Ready, set, draw! Grab your kids, art supplies, and spread the word--about marine debris of course!

Posted: October 17, 2014
Three men by the water's edge.

On October 7-9, 2014, staff from OR&R’s Emergency Response Division met at the NOAA Kasitsna Bay Laboratory, near Homer, Alaska, to share new science and technology for emergency response.

Posted: October 17, 2014
Students watching a presentation on a large screen.

On October 14, 2014, the NOAA Disaster Response Center (DRC) hosted the annual SkyWarn Program Storm Spotter Training offered by the Mobile-Pensacola Weather Forecasting Office.

Posted: October 17, 2014

OR&R’s Dr. Alan Mearns, Courtney Arthur, and Nicolle Rutherford partnered with experts from California State University, EPA and industry to compose Effects of Pollution on Marine Organisms .

Posted: October 17, 2014
Water celery in a river.

Until recently the lower Hudson River estuary supported about 4450 acres of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV).