Articles from September 7, 2018

Posted: September 7, 2018

SEPT. 7, 2018 — On Aug. 28, Sarah Lowe with the OR&R's Marine Debris Program participated in the Ohio Science Writer's Workshop at the Ohio State University’s Stone Laboratory on Gibraltar Island at Put-in-Bay.

Posted: September 7, 2018

SEPT. 7, 2018 — On Aug. 30, Peter Murphy, Alaska regional coordinator for the NOAA Marine Debris Program, presented and helped facilitate a marine debris workshop at the Southeast (Alaska) Environmental Conference.

Posted: September 7, 2018

SEPT. 7, 2018 — On Sept. 6, OR&R's Emergency Response Division supported the U.S. Coast Guard’s District 13 Federal On-Scene Coordinator workshop. Other presenters included contracting officers from Coast Guard headquarters, Washington State’s Historic Preservation Officer, and a team of salvage masters from Global Diving and Salvage.

Posted: September 7, 2018
A group of people standing on a shoreline looking at a dam.

SEPT. 7, 2018 — The Bloede Dam, located within Patapsco Valley State Park in Maryland, has stood as a public safety hazard and barrier to wildlife for more than a century. Its removal is one of the largest and most complicated dam removals undertaken by NOAA.

Posted: September 7, 2018
A group of people putting a sign on a large bin.

SEPT. 7, 2018 — On Aug. 15, members from the NOAA Marine Debris Program conducted a site visit to the James Campbell National Wildlife Refuge and installed signage on a newly-purchased marine debris collection bin. This bin represents a collaborative effort to deal with O‘ahu’s long-standing issue of marine debris disposals at local convenience centers.

Posted: September 7, 2018
A group of people standing along a shoreline habitat.

SEPT. 7, 2018 — Historically, the upper portion of the Hudson River estuary between approximately Athens and Troy, New York, consisted of braided river channels. Intertidal and shallow water habitats within these channels supported emergent and submerged vegetation and functioned as important fish habitat.

Articles from September 7, 2018

Posted: September 7, 2018

SEPT. 7, 2018 — On Aug. 28, Sarah Lowe with the OR&R's Marine Debris Program participated in the Ohio Science Writer's Workshop at the Ohio State University’s Stone Laboratory on Gibraltar Island at Put-in-Bay.

Posted: September 7, 2018

SEPT. 7, 2018 — On Aug. 30, Peter Murphy, Alaska regional coordinator for the NOAA Marine Debris Program, presented and helped facilitate a marine debris workshop at the Southeast (Alaska) Environmental Conference.

Posted: September 7, 2018

SEPT. 7, 2018 — On Sept. 6, OR&R's Emergency Response Division supported the U.S. Coast Guard’s District 13 Federal On-Scene Coordinator workshop. Other presenters included contracting officers from Coast Guard headquarters, Washington State’s Historic Preservation Officer, and a team of salvage masters from Global Diving and Salvage.

Posted: September 7, 2018
A group of people standing on a shoreline looking at a dam.

SEPT. 7, 2018 — The Bloede Dam, located within Patapsco Valley State Park in Maryland, has stood as a public safety hazard and barrier to wildlife for more than a century. Its removal is one of the largest and most complicated dam removals undertaken by NOAA.

Posted: September 7, 2018
A group of people putting a sign on a large bin.

SEPT. 7, 2018 — On Aug. 15, members from the NOAA Marine Debris Program conducted a site visit to the James Campbell National Wildlife Refuge and installed signage on a newly-purchased marine debris collection bin. This bin represents a collaborative effort to deal with O‘ahu’s long-standing issue of marine debris disposals at local convenience centers.

Posted: September 7, 2018
A group of people standing along a shoreline habitat.

SEPT. 7, 2018 — Historically, the upper portion of the Hudson River estuary between approximately Athens and Troy, New York, consisted of braided river channels. Intertidal and shallow water habitats within these channels supported emergent and submerged vegetation and functioned as important fish habitat.