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Story Maps

Dive into the science with one of our StoryMaps, which combine maps, text, and other multi-media in an immersive online platform.

A sea of people on a beach sitting under differently colored umbrellas.

By examining beachgoer behavior, this new study helps us understand the potential economic effects of marine debris on the coastal tourism economy.  

Cleanup worker on beach after Exxon Valdez. Image credit: Alaska Public Archive.

Thirty years ago on March 24, 1989, the Exxon Valdez oil spill occurred. It was America's largest oil spill at the time, and is largely credited with the passage of the Oil Pollution Act.

From Aug. 27-Sept. 4, the National Geodetic Survey (NGS) collected damage assessment imagery in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey. The aerial imagery was collected in specific areas identified by FEMA and the National Weather Service. Image credit: NGS.

In an update on the 2017 hurricane season in August, NOAA announced the likelihood for an above-normal hurricane season. With Hurricane Harvey came a new record for the wettest tropical system in the continental U.S. and shortly after, the Category 5 Hurricane Irma broke yet another record, becoming the strongest Atlantic Ocean hurricane.

This map highlights the $34.3 million NOAA secured in 2018 with cooperating companies across America to restore natural resources damaged by industrial pollution and oil spills. Six pollution cases were settled, resolving several companies of their liability, and totaling $34.3 million that will go toward restoration.

The Lower Duwamish River is a Superfund site near Seattle. Image credit: Environmental Protection Agency.

The Duwamish River has been a hazardous waste site since the mid-1900s. Though it was once a wide, meandering river with large areas of mudflats and marshes, by the 1940s the 9-mile estuary had transformed into a 5-mile industrial waterway — destroying 97% of the original habitat. 

Dr. Brian Stacy, NOAA veterinarian, prepares to clean an oiled Kemp's Ridley turtle. Image credit: NOAA and Georgia Dept. of Natural Resources.

To best prepare oil spill experts for oil spills where sea turtles could be impacted, NOAA has released “Guidelines for OIl Spill Response and Natural Resource Damage Assessment: Sea Turtles." The document is accessible online.