Back to top

Shoreline Cleanup and Assessment Technique (SCAT) Classes

Two instructors hold up a diagram to explain to several students the percent cover of oil. Bridge in background.
SCAT instructors use a chart to help explain percent cover of oil on shorelines. Image credit: Anthony Chavez, State of Oregon

NOAA OR&R offers training in Shoreline Cleanup Assessment Technique (SCAT)—a systematic method that responders use for surveying an affected shoreline after an oil spill. SCAT teams collect the data needed to develop a shoreline cleanup plan that maximizes the recovery of oiled habitats and resources, while minimizing the risk of injury from cleanup efforts.

When and Where

SCAT training is conducted throughout the country for the U.S. Coast Guard and state governments. These training events are not offered on a set schedule.

SCAT classes are coordinated through OR&R's regional Scientific Support Coordinators (SSCs), who are co-located with the U.S. Coast Guard District Offices around the country.

Your SSC is the best source of information for SCAT training events in your region. You can find contact information for SSCs on our OR&R Field Staff page.

More Information about SCAT Resources

In addition to providing training, OR&R has produced supplemental resources that instruct in proper shoreline assessment techniques, and that responders can use to record observations during a shoreline survey.

Shoreline Assessment Manual: This manual outlines methods for conducting shoreline assessment and using the results to make cleanup decisions at oil spills.

Shoreline Assessment Job Aid: This job aid was developed for use in the field and to supplement the manual, providing a visual guide to many of the terms used and conditions found during shoreline assessments.

Shoreline Assessment Forms: These are standard forms you can download, print out, and then use to record your observations during a shoreline survey following an oil spill. Different forms have been developed for different habitats and types of oiling (e.g., coastal, river, wetland, tarball oiling, etc.).
 

Questions: Contact us with your questions, comments, or suggestions about SCAT training.

Last updated Wednesday, February 19, 2020 2:46pm PST